cdooley

Staffing in the 1970s and 1980s... The Role of Recruiting

Blog Post created by cdooley Advocate on Jul 29, 2016

Compensation Data Facts - What's What

in Compensation

 

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DID YOU KNOW?

History of staffing continued... Job shoppers worked with a handful of recruiters that were charged with keeping them employed. Since there were no cell phones "jobbers" had their own language containing codes used to speak with their recruiters to describe their current work status and the money they were looking to make. If a recruiter wanted to know what someone was making, he/she would simply throw out a figure like $25 and if the person at the other end was making $27, they would just say “+2”. The same held true when negotiating rates for a new job.

 

After a downturn in the economy and cutbacks in military, aerospace and research budgets, the call for huge numbers of contract engineers on special projects disappeared as well as the unique lifestyle. Many road warriors are now reluctant warriors, forced to leave home because they can’t find work locally. They are no longer paid better than regular employees and in many cases, they are now paid less.

 

The technical staffing industry, and what was really the precursor to the entire “temporary” industry, was started in 1940 by Harold L. Yoh (H.L. Yoh Company, part of the Day & Zimmerman family of companies). This was done as an effort to help the U.S. government with the war effort, designing production facilities and manufacturing plants.

 

More tomorrow...


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